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  Sharp Love, Sharp Kittens  got an awesome review in  Film Threat  yesterday!  Check out an excerpt below: 
 Set in New York,   Sharp Love, Sharp Kittens   tells the story of an ambitious deadbeat, Tony DeFazio (Joe Diomede), the roofer (though he’d rather be known as a painter). Like any common deadbeat, he’s having a shit day. Today he comes home to voicemails of angry bill collectors and an angry gym fitness employee (who threatens him with her big brother if he doesn’t stop calling her), but is blind-sided by the third message from his daughter, who he hasn’t seen in a long time. She’s going to be at a bar in Brooklyn in a few hours and wants to see him. After a brief visit with his weight lifting-obsessed neighbor, he leaves his small apartment in Queens for the Brooklyn visit with his daughter. 
 Tony finally reunites with his daughter and right before they get to indulge in catching up, her bitchy friends unexpectedly arrive (these cats have claws). When he finally gets them to leave and Tony starts the long overdue conversation with her, we learn he has always meant well, to everyone — he’s just a guy who’s lived a life of fumbling and constantly dropping the ball. He just wants people to like him. 
   Read the rest of the review at:    http://www.filmthreat.com/reviews/56426

Sharp Love, Sharp Kittens got an awesome review in Film Threat yesterday!  Check out an excerpt below:

Set in New York, Sharp Love, Sharp Kittens tells the story of an ambitious deadbeat, Tony DeFazio (Joe Diomede), the roofer (though he’d rather be known as a painter). Like any common deadbeat, he’s having a shit day. Today he comes home to voicemails of angry bill collectors and an angry gym fitness employee (who threatens him with her big brother if he doesn’t stop calling her), but is blind-sided by the third message from his daughter, who he hasn’t seen in a long time. She’s going to be at a bar in Brooklyn in a few hours and wants to see him. After a brief visit with his weight lifting-obsessed neighbor, he leaves his small apartment in Queens for the Brooklyn visit with his daughter.

Tony finally reunites with his daughter and right before they get to indulge in catching up, her bitchy friends unexpectedly arrive (these cats have claws). When he finally gets them to leave and Tony starts the long overdue conversation with her, we learn he has always meant well, to everyone — he’s just a guy who’s lived a life of fumbling and constantly dropping the ball. He just wants people to like him.


Read the rest of the review at: 
http://www.filmthreat.com/reviews/56426